Category Archives: Podcast

History of Omaha’s Eppley Airfield

In 1927 a lawsuit tried to prevent the land that is now Eppley Airfield from usage as an airport. However, the judge ruled against that restriction, and the City declared the area as the new Municipal Airport and hangars were immediately built. An American Legion gathering in Omaha immediately drew crowds and it was referred to as the American Legion Airfield for a short time. The airport boomed into 1929. Adam explains what happened.

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History of the Minne Lusa Historic District

In 1907, the Royal Amusement Company developed plans for 40-acres of today’s Minne Lusa neighborhood. Royal paid $65,000 to an architect named J. B. Mason to design six buildings, including a pavilion, a 2-story dance hall, two dining halls, a boat house, club house and a roller rink. The amusement park never came to exist. But Minne Lusa became the biggest subdivision in Omaha at that time.

Support the North Omaha History podcast. Please go to Patreon.com/Omaha and become a patron for as little as $1 a month. We’ll give your a free gift 🙂

Visit Adam’s North Omaha History blog and like his Facebook page for all kinds of great stuff.

Shop for and buy Adam’s books on Amazon

History of North Omaha’s Hummel Park

In 1930, 200 acres of land on the southwest corner of River Drive and Ponca Road were donated to the City of Omaha to become a park. It was named after Joseph B. Hummel, the long-time superintendent of Omaha’s Parks and Recreation Department, and one of the most influential parks advocates ever in Omaha. Adam Fletcher Sasse tells us all about Hummel Park, including Manuel Lisa’s time there.

Support the North Omaha History podcast. Please go to Patreon.com/Omaha and become a patron for as little as $1 a month. We’ll give your a free gift 🙂

Visit Adam’s North Omaha History blog and like his Facebook page for all kinds of great stuff.

Shop for and buy Adam’s books on Amazon

History of the North Omaha Bottoms

Imagine its December 2, 1863, and you’re standing in the cold with major dignitaries like A. J. Poppleton, Augustus Kountze, Ed Creighton, John Redick and A. J. Hanscom. Everyone’s here to break ground on the much anticipated Union Pacific railroad, which will provide the first transcontinental railroad in the U.S. You’re in Carter Lake, at the end south of Locust, in an area that doesn’t exist anymore.

Support the North Omaha History podcast. Please go to Patreon.com/Omaha and become a patron for as little as $1 a month. We’ll give your a free gift 🙂

Visit Adam’s North Omaha History blog and like his Facebook page for all kinds of great stuff.

Shop for and buy Adam’s books on Amazon

History of Fort Omaha

Nestled between the Miller Park neighborhood and Sorenson Parkway is a 150-year-old institution that’s been a powerhouse, a prison, a balloon school and neglected surplus. But at one time, it was the main destination for all troops and stores for the western side of the Missouri River. Tell us about Fort Omaha Adam.

Support the North Omaha History podcast. Please go to Patreon.com/Omaha and become a patron for as little as $1 a month. We’ll give your a free gift 🙂

Visit Adam’s North Omaha History blog and like his Facebook page for all kinds of great stuff.

Shop for and buy Adam’s books on Amazon

History of North Omaha’s Walnut Hill Neighborhood

One of the first suburbs in Omaha is the Walnut Hill neighborhood. Bounded by Cuming Street on the south, Northwest Radial Highway and Saddle Creek Road on the west, N. 40th Street on the east, and Lake Street on the north, the Walnut Hill neighborhood has a lot of unique features and a rich history.

Support the North Omaha History podcast. Please go to Patreon.com/Omaha and become a patron for as little as $1 a month. We’ll give your a free gift 🙂

Visit Adam’s North Omaha History blog and like his Facebook page for all kinds of great stuff.

Shop for and buy Adam’s books on Amazon

History of North Omaha’s St. Clare’s Monastery

Located in the middle of the hustle and bustle is a spectacularly beautiful, formerly consecrated rental facility that few people in the entire city know about. For more than a century there was a monastery for Catholic nuns located at N. 29th and Hamilton Streets. Adam, tell us about one of North Omaha’s hidden holy grounds.

Support the North Omaha History podcast. Please go to Patreon.com/Omaha and become a patron for as little as $1 a month. We’ll give your a free gift 🙂

Visit Adam’s North Omaha History blog and like his Facebook page for all kinds of great stuff.

Shop for and buy Adam’s books on Amazon

History of North Omaha’s Florence Neighborhood

The history of Florence begins with the tangled clopping of horse hooves and rattling of the sideboards on beat up wagons. The story of the town begins with people leaving, people coming back, a town booming, a town shrinking, and then getting annexed into Omaha and calming down. It’s a story that’s still being written every day, and lately things are on the up and up!

Support the North Omaha History podcast. Please go to Patreon.com/Omaha and become a patron for as little as $1 a month. We’ll give your a free gift 🙂

Visit Adam’s North Omaha History blog and like his Facebook page for all kinds of great stuff.

Shop for and buy Adam’s books on Amazon

History of North Omaha’s Brandeis Country Home

After long, busy weeks in hot downtown Omaha offices, business leaders wanted to relax and enjoy the splendor of their wealth. Crammed against busy urban streets and filled with reminders of work, their swanky Gold Coast homes weren’t perfect settings. Instead, they built lavish country estates as getaways for their families. Far North Omaha’s bucolic settings included the rolling hills west of Florence. And that’s where Arthur Brandeis had Arlena Lodge.

Support the North Omaha History podcast. Please go to Patreon.com/Omaha and become a patron for as little as $1 a month. We’ll give your a free gift 🙂

Visit Adam’s North Omaha History blog and like his Facebook page for all kinds of great stuff.

Shop for and buy Adam’s books on Amazon

A History of North Omaha’s Storz Brewery

Before Gottlieb Storz, a few other entrepreneurs tried their hand at brewing beer in North Omaha. Afterwards though, Storz dominated. For more than 75 years, his family ran Omaha’s beer industry, and even though the brewery closed in the 1970s, it left a major mark on the city that still stands today.

Support the North Omaha History podcast. Please go to Patreon.com/Omaha and become a patron for as little as $1 a month. We’ll give your a free gift 🙂

Visit Adam’s North Omaha History blog and like his Facebook page for all kinds of great stuff.

Shop for and buy Adam’s books on Amazon