Category Archives: Podcast

History of Higher Education in North Omaha

Did you know that North Omaha has been home to FIVE higher education institutions in its history? It was 1863 when the Town of Saratoga, now located in North Omaha, went to the Nebraska Territorial Legislature and secured a charter for the first-ever University of Nebraska. Unfortunately, their efforts amounted to nill—but their legacy did not!

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History of the North Omaha Streetcar Barn

Imagine a time when riding a streetcar was interesting, respected and almost a little glamorous. On the dusty, granite-covered streets of Omaha, that time was during the 1870s and 1880s. That new technology needed fanciful buildings to go along with the times, and the streetcar maintenance shop at 2606 North 26th Street in North Omaha was one of those buildings.

Help us meet expenses and keep the light on at the North Omaha History Podcast by becoming a patron. Please go to Patreon.com/Omaha

History of the Lost Towns in North Omaha

There are several lost towns and villages located inside present-day North Omaha. Over time, they’ve been annexed, absorbed and otherwise soaked into the fabric of the city of Omaha and largely forgotten. Only Florence and Benson have retained distinctive identities as dedicated former towns. The rest are almost wholly missing from the public record.

Help us meet expenses and keep the light on at the North Omaha History Podcast by becoming a patron. Please go to Patreon.com/Omaha

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History of African American Newspapers in Omaha

North Omaha’s African American culture has grown and changed dramatically since its founding in 1854. One of the main drivers of the culture for more than a century has been the Black media. From the time Omaha’s first Black newspaper was published in 1889 through Shanelle Williams’ continued use of Facebook, Twitter and other social media today to build the African American community in Omaha, Black media has continued to transform the North Omaha community and the city at large.

Help us meet expenses and keep the light on at the North Omaha History Podcast by becoming a patron. Please go to Patreon.com/Omaha

History of Railroads in North Omaha

The Belt Line railway was once a passenger service, then an industrial line for 75+ years. Today, there’s nothing left of it besides an empty rail bed. The railroad heading up the modern-day Sorensen Parkway was the Fremont, Elkhorn & Missouri Valley Railroad. Another railroad headed north from the Webster Street Station north to Florence and points beyond. It was the Chicago, St. Paul, Minneapolis and Omaha Railway, aka the Omaha Road.

Help us meet expenses and keep the light on at the North Omaha History Podcast by becoming a patron. Please go to Patreon.com/Omaha

History of Reed’s Ice Cream in North Omaha

Reed’s Ice Cream was a popular business that opened in Omaha in 1930, and operated into the early 1960s. Their signature bungalows were strategically spread throughout the community, and heavily anchored in several North Omaha neighborhoods. So, what happened to Reed’s? Adam Fletcher Sasse explains.

You can help us meet expenses and keep the light on at the North Omaha History Podcast by becoming a patron. Please go to Patreon.com/Omaha

History of Omaha’s Eppley Airfield

In 1927 a lawsuit tried to prevent the land that is now Eppley Airfield from usage as an airport. However, the judge ruled against that restriction, and the City declared the area as the new Municipal Airport and hangars were immediately built. An American Legion gathering in Omaha immediately drew crowds and it was referred to as the American Legion Airfield for a short time. The airport boomed into 1929. Adam explains what happened.

Support the North Omaha History podcast. Please go to Patreon.com/Omaha and become a patron for as little as $1 a month. We’ll give your a free gift 🙂

Visit Adam’s North Omaha History blog and like his Facebook page for all kinds of great stuff.

Shop for and buy Adam’s books on Amazon

History of the Minne Lusa Historic District

In 1907, the Royal Amusement Company developed plans for 40-acres of today’s Minne Lusa neighborhood. Royal paid $65,000 to an architect named J. B. Mason to design six buildings, including a pavilion, a 2-story dance hall, two dining halls, a boat house, club house and a roller rink. The amusement park never came to exist. But Minne Lusa became the biggest subdivision in Omaha at that time.

Support the North Omaha History podcast. Please go to Patreon.com/Omaha and become a patron for as little as $1 a month. We’ll give your a free gift 🙂

Visit Adam’s North Omaha History blog and like his Facebook page for all kinds of great stuff.

Shop for and buy Adam’s books on Amazon

History of North Omaha’s Hummel Park

In 1930, 200 acres of land on the southwest corner of River Drive and Ponca Road were donated to the City of Omaha to become a park. It was named after Joseph B. Hummel, the long-time superintendent of Omaha’s Parks and Recreation Department, and one of the most influential parks advocates ever in Omaha. Adam Fletcher Sasse tells us all about Hummel Park, including Manuel Lisa’s time there.

Support the North Omaha History podcast. Please go to Patreon.com/Omaha and become a patron for as little as $1 a month. We’ll give your a free gift 🙂

Visit Adam’s North Omaha History blog and like his Facebook page for all kinds of great stuff.

Shop for and buy Adam’s books on Amazon

History of the North Omaha Bottoms

Imagine its December 2, 1863, and you’re standing in the cold with major dignitaries like A. J. Poppleton, Augustus Kountze, Ed Creighton, John Redick and A. J. Hanscom. Everyone’s here to break ground on the much anticipated Union Pacific railroad, which will provide the first transcontinental railroad in the U.S. You’re in Carter Lake, at the end south of Locust, in an area that doesn’t exist anymore.

Support the North Omaha History podcast. Please go to Patreon.com/Omaha and become a patron for as little as $1 a month. We’ll give your a free gift 🙂

Visit Adam’s North Omaha History blog and like his Facebook page for all kinds of great stuff.

Shop for and buy Adam’s books on Amazon