A History of the Execution of Cyrus Tator in North Omaha

Lynchings, shootings and hangings occurred in Omaha City before the Nebraska Territory was founded in 1854. The Omaha Claim Club, made up of the city’s founding fathers, was notorious for using intimidation, threats, and drownings in order to enforce their will. In 1860, the US Supreme Court made their actions illegal, so they had to find other means to enforce their notions of justice. In 1863, the Nebraska Territory held its first legal execution in North Omaha.

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A History of Omaha’s Greater America Exposition of 1899

For years, we’ve been told the buildings of the 1898 Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition were demolished right after the event ended in the fall of that year. But they weren’t destroyed! Instead, after all the success Omaha had with the Expo, a group of investors decided they needed to keep the buildings up and start another grand event. Working together, they raised enough money to buy the buildings.

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A History of Native Americans in North Omaha

A lot of different groups of people lived in the Omaha area before Europeans started stealing the land. Thousands of years ago, big game hunters dominated the area, while later people were farmers and hunters living along the Missouri River. For instance, according to the Nebraska State Historical Society, the area from Creighton University to the river was an Otoe earth lodge village around 1700. Archeologists have found that tribes have lived in this region for at least 10,000 years.

Support the North Omaha History podcast. Please go to NorthOmahaHistory.com/Podcast – click on the “Patreon” icon and become a patron for as little as $1 a month and we’ll give you the historical fiction thriller, “Murder on Saddle Creek Road” by Adam Fletcher Sasse.

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A History of Omaha’s River Drive

Imagine a smooth, easy drive on a Saturday afternoon in the fall all of it weaving along nineteen miles of the city’s waterfront. There are long, calm curves and tall, stately oaks lining the boulevard, with walkers and bikes moving along a nice sidewalk that goes that entire distance. At evening, you turn to go home, your way lit by warm street lamps along with the glow of fireflies.

Support the North Omaha History podcast. Please go to NorthOmahaHistory.com/Podcast – click on the “Patreon” icon and become a patron for as little as $1 a month and we’ll give you the historical fiction thriller, “Murder on Saddle Creek Road” by Adam Fletcher Sasse.

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A History of Hospitals and Healthcare in North Omaha

Today, North Omaha is a medical desert. With more than 40,000 residents in its boundaries, there is a stark absence of medical service providers of all kinds. Making it worse, the community is greatly under insured. That leaves people who have no insurance and no money needing to travel to other parts of the city to get care. However, that hasn’t always been the case. There have been more than ten hospitals in North Omaha throughout its 150+ year history.

Support the North Omaha History podcast. Please go to NorthOmahaHistory.com/Podcast – click on the “Patreon” icon and become a patron for as little as $1 a month and we’ll give you the historical fiction thriller, “Murder on Saddle Creek Road” by Adam Fletcher Sasse.

Visit Adam’s North Omaha History blog and like his Facebook page for all kinds of great stuff.

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A History of Theatres in North Omaha

While there are no active movie theaters in North Omaha today, there have been at least 25 movie theaters over the last century. There are few records of the earliest theaters. A reader of Adam’s blog pointed out they were mostly a sheet on a wall with a few dozen folding chairs. But Adam went through old advertisements in the Omaha Bee newspaper, as well as city directories from the 1910s and 1920s. Listen in to learn more.

Support the North Omaha History podcast. Please go to NorthOmahaHistory.com/Podcast – click on the “Patreon” icon and become a patron for as little as $1 a month and we’ll give you the historical fiction thriller, “Murder on Saddle Creek Road” by Adam Fletcher Sasse.

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A History of Mansions and Estates in North Omaha

North Omaha has been home to several large mansions and estates, especially in its early years. Built in the grand tradition of wealthy families, they were intended to broadcast success and ensure comfort. These fine homes belonged to real estate moguls, rich businessmen, and old Eastern inheritors that moved west. Some were elegant and restrained, while others simply oozed money. None of these mansions were built to be accessible as they all sat on regal country estates.

Support the North Omaha History podcast. Please go to NorthOmahaHistory.com/Podcast – click on the “Patreon” icon and become a patron for as little as $1 a month and we’ll give you the historical fiction thriller, “Murder on Saddle Creek Road” by Adam Fletcher Sasse.

Visit Adam’s North Omaha History blog and like his Facebook page for all kinds of great stuff.

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A History of Ghost Stories in North_Omaha

In a place as old as North Omaha, there are bound to be a lot of ghost stories. Adam has researched stories about the Ghosts of Fort Omaha, the Lady in White, Carter Lake’s Burning Lady, the Immanuel Deaconess Tunnels, the Chapel at Forest Lawn Cemetery, the Ghosts at Hummel Park and North Omaha’s Missing Cemeteries. Adam tells some ghost stories!

Support the North Omaha History podcast. Please go to NorthOmahaHistory.com/Podcast – click on the “Patreon” icon and become a patron for as little as $1 a month and we’ll give you the historical fiction thriller, “Murder on Saddle Creek Road” by Adam Fletcher Sasse.

Visit Adam’s North Omaha History blog and like his Facebook page for all kinds of great stuff.

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History of Original Omaha University in North Omaha

Along the tree-lined streets and fine middle and upper class homes of Kountze Place in North Omaha, the staff of Omaha’s Presbyterian Theological Seminary decided in the early 20th century to start a new university. For 30 years, the neighborhood was home to the eventual University of Nebraska at Omaha.

Support the North Omaha History podcast. Please go to https://northomahahistory.com/podcast/ – click on the “Patreon” icon and become a patron for as little as $1 a month!

Visit Adam’s Omaha History blog at https://northomahahistory.com and like his Facebook page for all kinds of great stuff https://www.facebook.com/NorthOmahaHistory

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A History of Streetcars in North Omaha

When the Trans-Mississippi Exposition happened in North Omaha in 1898, the city wanted to make sure all visitors knew how easy it was to get to the site. Using some promotional materials from that time, Adam’s written a history of streetcars in North Omaha in the 1890s.This history surely changed a lot between then and 1955, when the last streetcars ran in the city. Adam fills us in on this story.

Support the North Omaha History podcast. Please go to https://northomahahistory.com/podcast/ – click on the “Patreon” icon and become a patron for as little as $1 a month!

Visit Adam’s Omaha History blog at https://northomahahistory.com and like his Facebook page for all kinds of great stuff https://www.facebook.com/NorthOmahaHistory

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